Colombia plane crash: 6th survivor found under fuselage — WGNO

Watch Video NEAR MEDELLIN, Colombia (CNN) – Authorities say they’ve found a sixth survivor of a plane crash in Colombia. The man was found under the fuselage, according to Mauricio Parodi, a local disaster official. Medellin Mayor Federico Gutiérrez says 75 people were killed in the crash and six people were injured. A charter plane carrying…

via Colombia plane crash: 6th survivor found under fuselage — WGNO

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Albert DeSalvo Body To Be Dug Up For DNA In Boston Strangler Case — CBS Boston

Albert DeSalvo’s remains will be dug up because DNA from the scene of Mary Sullivan’s rape and murder produced a “familial match” with him.

via Albert DeSalvo Body To Be Dug Up For DNA In Boston Strangler Case — CBS Boston

Conservation Connection – Understanding decomposer lifeforms

ST. LOUIS (KPLR) – Naturalist Curtis Parsons visits KPLR 11 News at Noon to show us the mysterious world of decomposers. Q. What are decomposers? • Decomposers are organisms that help break down dead and decaying matter • Some decomposers specialize on breaking down plants or animals • Today we’ll focus on animal decomposers, especially insects…

via Conservation Connection – Understanding decomposer lifeforms — kplr11.com

Spent nuclear fuel canisters vulnerable to failure as they age — nuclear-news

Premature failure of U.S. spent nuclear fuel storage canisters, San Onofre Safety.org, by Donna Gilmore “……Stainless Steel Dry Canister Problems Darrell Dunn, an NRC materials engineer, stated stainless steel dry storage canisters are vulnerable to failure within about 25 – 42 years. If any of the fuel cladding in the canister fails, there is no protective barrier and […]

via Spent nuclear fuel canisters vulnerable to failure as they age — nuclear-news

Counteranalysis via Freud

In psychology, the term was first employed by Sigmund Freud‘s colleague Josef Breuer (1842–1925), who developed a “cathartic” treatment using hypnosis for persons suffering from extensive hysteria. While under hypnosis, Breuer’s patients were able to recall traumatic experiences, and through the process of expressing the original emotions that had been repressed and forgotten, they were relieved of their hysteric symptoms. Catharsis was also central to Freud’s concept ofpsychoanalysis, but he replaced hypnosis with free association.[16]

The term catharsis has also been adopted by modern psychotherapy, particularly Freudian psychoanalysis, to describe the act of expressing, or more accurately,experiencing the deep emotions often associated with events in the individual’s past which had originally been repressed or ignored, and had never been adequately addressed or experienced.

There has been much debate about the use of catharsis in the reduction of anger. Some scholars believe that “blowing off steam” may reduce physiological stress in the short term, but this reduction may act as a reward mechanism, reinforcing the behavior and promoting future outbursts.[17][18][19][20] However, other studies have suggested that using violent media may decrease hostility under periods of stress.[21] Legal scholars have linked “catharsis” to “closure”[22] (an individual’s desire for a firm answer to a question and an aversion toward ambiguity) and “satisfaction” which can be applied to affective strategies as diverse as retribution, on one hand, and forgiveness on the other.[23] Interestingly, there’s no “one size fits all” definition of “catharsis”,[24] and this doesn’t allow a clear definition of its use in therapeutic terms.

COUNTERANALYSIS
counteranalysis.org

Patty Hearst crime history: September 18, 1975

On this date in 1975, heiress-turned-hostage-turned- revolutionary Patty Hearst was arrested by the FBI in San Francisco. And so began her transformation from radical chic to jailhouse geek. She was tried, convicted, and given a seven year sentence that was commuted in 1979. She was pardoned in January 2001 .

Further reading:

Wikipedia entry on Patty Hears

Nobody Move!

PattyMugshot

On this date in 1975, heiress-turned-hostage-turned- revolutionary Patty Hearst was arrested by the FBI in San Francisco. And so began her transformation from radical chic to jailhouse geek. She was tried, convicted, and given a seven year sentence that was commuted in 1979 (thanks, Jimmy!). She was pardoned in January 2001 (thanks, Bill!).

Further reading:

Wikipedia entry on Patty Hearst

Patty Hearst, actress

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this day in crime history: august 26, 1980

On this date in 1980, two men made an early morning delivery of what appeared to be computer equipment to the Harvey’s Resort and Casino in Stateline, NV. Harvey’s employees soon discovered the “computer equipment” and the note attached to it. The note informed them that the large package was a bomb, and that it would go off unless the bombers were paid $3 million by the casino.

Police, the FBI, and the ATF were called in. Bomb squad personnel examined the object and confirmed that it was a bomb. The device, which was very sophisticated, contained a large amount of dynamite.

The decision was made to pay the ransom, then concentrate on tracking down the extortionists later. Unfortunately, the delivery of the ransom money – which was to be done by police helicopter – didn’t go off as planned. This left the bomb squad with the task of figuring out how to disarm the largest dynamite bomb anyone in law enforcement had ever seen.

After x-raying the equipment and carefully examining it, the explosive ordnance disposal experts decided that the best was to disarm it way to quickly disconnect the detonators before they could set off the dynamite. To do this, they rigged shaped charges of C-4 and positioned them so they would blow the detonators off. Sand bags were stacked around the bomb to minimize the damage in case the plan didn’t work. This was a good idea, as the plan didn’t work. The shaped charges set the bomb off, destroying most of the casino and causing some damage to the neighboring hotel. Thankfully, there were no injuries from the explosion.

As the ensuing investigation unfolded, a suspect soon emerged: a Hungarian immigrant from Clovis, CA named John Birges. Birges, as it turned out, lost thousands of dollars gambling at Harvey’s. (note to all you high rollers out there: You can lose. That’s why they call it “gambling.”) In the summer of 1981, investigators received a tip that Birges had stolen dynamite from a construction site. Forensic examination matched the dynamite used at the site with that used in the Harvey’s Casino bomb. John Birges was arrested in August 1981, almost a year after the bombing. His three accomplices were soon arrested as well. It wasn’t long before they flipped and agreed to testify against Birges in exchange for lighter sentences. John Birges was convicted of multiple state and federal crimes. He died in prison of liver cancer in 1996.

Nobody Move!

On this date in 1980, two men made an early morning delivery of what appeared to be computer equipment to the Harvey’s Resort and Casino in Stateline, NV. Harvey’s employees soon discovered the “computer equipment” and the note attached to it. The note informed them that the large package was a bomb, and that it would go off unless the bombers were paid $3 million by the casino.

Police, the FBI, and the ATF were called in. Bomb squad personnel examined the object and confirmed that it was a bomb. The device, which was very sophisticated, contained a large amount of dynamite.

The decision was made to pay the ransom, then concentrate on tracking down the extortionists later. Unfortunately, the delivery of the ransom money – which was to be done by police helicopter – didn’t go off as planned. This left the bomb squad with the task of figuring…

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